Most Americans Support Higher Fuel Efficiency Standards

Going green — By on July 9, 2011 at 2:57 am
Fuel economy Most Americans Support Higher Fuel Efficiency Standards

Gas tank running on empty?

Rising gas prices this spring have taken a toll on the potential economic recovery and have led to many families cutting back plans for road trips this summer.  So, its probably not surprising that most Americans support higher fuel efficiency standards.

A majority of those polled this spring stated that they support an Obama Administration proposal to raise nation-wide vehicle efficiency standards to 60 miles per gallon (mpg) by 2025, according to a report from the Consumer Federation of America.

The current standard is 27.5 mpg, and the requirement will increase to 35.5 mpg by 2016.

As a step in the right direction, revamped fuel economy labels for new cars will be mandated starting in 2012.

Unfortunately, this is not the first time there has been discussion in favor of higher fuel efficiency standards.  Discussion and negotiations will simply not do it, without action to mandate vehicles that require less fossil fuels to operate.

Consider this video from 3 years ago:

Consider excerpt from the report:

“‘Concern about volatile gasoline prices and support for higher standards is driven by the huge and rising bite gas expenditures are taking from household budgets—from less than $2000 in 2009 to more than $3000 this year.  Pain at the pump, along with the country’s oil import dependence, has produced a growing consensus that the federal government should substantially increase fuel economy standards. And among independent technical experts, there is a growing consensus that committed car companies could meet these higher standards.”

Mark Cooper, CFA’s research director and energy expert.

fuel efficiency Most Americans Support Higher Fuel Efficiency Standards

Fuel Efficiency Standards Help Save Energy

In the survey, 62% of Republicans and 71% of Democrats supported doubling fuel efficiency standards.  These results show that, when people’s wallets are impacted, efficiency and conservation are a bipartisan issue.

Part of what is driving Americans to support higher fuel efficiency standards is the blame game.  In other words, who is to blame for high gas prices?

1.      Oil and gas companies   38%
2.      Exporting nations           22%
3.      Obama                            12%
4.      Economic cycle              11%

What do you think of these poll results?  How would you have voted?

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1 Comment

  1. Luis says:

    Not only are people looking for fuel efficient cars, they’re avoiding car usage all together. They’ve also looked into carpooling: http://ecomobility.tv/2011/05/16/gas-prices-fuel-carpooling-programs/

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